Custom Framed Cork Board

  • Difficulty Rating: Beginner
Custom Framed Cork Board

There is something about having a cork board that I have always loved. I think it plays to my organized side – it keeps everything in its proper place with one little stick pin and helps me to feel anything and everything I might need in the near future is well within my reach.

There is something about having a cork board that I have always loved. I think it plays to my organized side – it keeps everything in its proper place with one little stick pin and helps me to feel anything and everything I might need in the near future is well within my reach. I honestly can’t remember a time in my life when I have not had a bulletin board or cork board or cube wall that allows me to stick a brightly colored pin with a photo, print out, ticket, or card attached. I just adore a good pinable board.

With that, and my new craft room, in mind, I decided I needed to have a functional, but pretty cork board that I could use to pinning all of my paper inspiration, as well as reminders and art made by the little hands in my house. So, I ran to the store, grabbed the necessary supplies and set off to work.

First, I looked to see what sizes I could get in cork. Knowing that I wanted one cohesive and consistent layer on top, I looked at both squares and rolls. I also looked at frame sizes and decided to go with a frame that was 12"x16". The thick squares for the backer come in 12"x12" sizes and the roll I found was 12"x24", so I could easily make a pretty and durable 12"x16" cork board.

I purchased both the squares and the roll so that it was actually thick enough to hold my pinned up goodness. The rolls are maybe an 1/8th-1/4 of an inch thick – not thick enough to hold much up. So, by putting down a layer of the squares which are significantly thicker, I have created a great base for my cork board.

To create the frame, follow these simple steps:

Remove the glass from the frame.

12 x 16 frame without glass

Cut the cork squares to the correct size (keep one square at the purchased 12"x12" size, cut then other to 4"x12" if using the 12"x16" frame).

cutting 12x12 cork

Adhere the cork squares to the frame backer with hot glue.

cork and backer

Cut your rolled cork to the correct length to match your frame size.

cutting cork roll 12x16

Using the ink color of your choice – I went hot pink – ink your letterpress plate and put it on the base plate. You want to just letterpress – not cut – the cork. Now, if it shifts, I used a removable glue dot to help hold it into place.
Lay the cork over your design, cover with the cutting plate, and run it through your machine. Re-ink and re-run it through as many times as you want to get the desired effect.

pressed cork

Once you are done, slowly glue and unroll the cork you letterpressed onto the cork squares, until it is completely covered. If the cork happened to stretch a bit when pressed, just flip it over once it is hot glued on and trim it with your craft knife.

hot glued and trimmed rolled cork

Replace all of this back into the frame. It will be much thicker than the original. If the frame holders don’t work because it is too thick, just hot glue the backer into place, all the way around the back edge of the frame. Finally, I used some cream colored cardstock and the full die/letterpress combo to create custom matching note cards to use on the board.

plate inked and ready to press and cut
pressed note card final

Now, all you have to do is find some great notes, inspiration, and treasures, and you are all set to put that pretty new cork board to work!

Final

Supply List

Cork

Ink

Frame

Hot glue

Cardstock